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We Missed You!

Coast Dermatology and Laser Surgery Center wishes to welcome you back. We hope you have all been safe and well during this COVID-19 pandemic. We greatly appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate through these challenging times together. As the state of this public health emergency changes from day to day, we will remain focused on keeping our patients and employees safe, healthy and informed.

Our office is currently open and scheduling appointments for your cosmetic and dermatological needs. In addition, we are offering Telehealth appointments for your convenience.

Most importantly we have worked very hard implementing new protocols and additional safety measures to ensure your safety and well-being and that of our employees.

New Safety Protocols:

To welcome you back we are offering monthly specials on many of our cosmetic services through the end of the year. Call today to learn more (949) 301-8019.


Updated Hours:

Monday: 8:00am - 12:00pm / 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Tuesday: 8:00am - 12:00pm / 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Wednesday: 8:00am - 12:00pm / 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Thursday: 8:00am - 12:00pm / 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Friday: 8:00am - 12:00pm / 1:00pm - 4:30pm

The Facts About Alopecia Areata

What is alopecia areata?

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 145 million people around the world. The condition causes the body’s immune system to attack the hair follicles, leading to patchy hair loss on the scalp and occasionally the eyebrows and lower body. The condition is characterized by discrete hair loss patches that often range from a half-inch to two inches in diameter.

Alopecia areata typically affects the hair follicles. In some cases, however, it can also lead to changes in the nails, causing indentations, discoloration, and sometimes nail loss.

How did I get alopecia areata?

A genetic element is involved in alopecia areata; it is believed to be an inherited condition. However, it is also associated with – and exacerbated by – certain medical disorders, so it’s important to have a thorough medical checkup if you experience patchy hair loss anywhere on your body.

Fortunately, most people affected by alopecia areata are otherwise perfectly healthy, though the conditions that activate and de-activate alopecia-related hair loss are not yet fully understood. People with alopecia areata might experience an outbreak that corresponds with high stress, depression, or anxiety.

Can alopecia areata go away without treatment?

Alopecia areata affects everyone differently. Some people experience a bald patch or two in their youth, after which their hair grows back, and they never have another outbreak. Sometimes the hair regrows more sparsely. Some patients have full regrowth after an outbreak, but experience another bout of hair loss months or years later. In rare cases, however, the hair loss progresses to complete baldness. The differences in severity between patients are not understood, and outbreaks are difficult – sometimes impossible – to predict.

Can alopecia areata be cured?

There is no cure for any autoimmune disorder, but highly effective treatments are available. One treatment that has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is a type of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor that disrupts the immune system’s response to hair follicles. To date, the drug has been approved for the treatment of severe alopecia areata.

Additional treatments include the administration of corticosteroids in topical, injectable, or oral tablet form. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents that block the immune system’s attack on hair follicles in people with mild symptoms. Many patients also achieve success with Minoxidil.

If you are experiencing unexplained, patchy hair loss, please don’t hesitate to contact us.


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